Lund University Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics

Electromagnetism (FYTB13)

Fall 2018

Runs every fall (first half) and spring (second half).

Intro meeting, fall 2018: Monday, September 3rd, at 3:15 PM, in Lecture Hall D (L315).

Links

Formal course specs (in Swedish)
Course page at Live@Lund

Literature

Introduction to Electrodynamics by D. J. Griffiths

4th Edition (ISBN-13: 978-1108420419), Cambridge University Press, 2017. (You can find errata on the homepage of the author.)

It also exists as a "Pearson new international edition" in paper-back (ISBN-10: 1-292-02142-X, ISBN-13: 978-1-292-02142-3). This is a collection of the chapters in the book, two out of three of the appendices and the pages on the inside of the cover (vector derivatives etc). It contains essentially the same material although all cross-references between chapters have been removed as each chapter is presented on its own (meaning that all chapters are presented as chapter nr 1 and that the index is a bit different than the original one). This also affects some of the problems and in fact some of them have been deleted. I will point to these cases during the course. You can find a list of corrections to this paper-back edition here. (See also the homepage of the author.)

If you get your hands on a copy of the 3rd edition that will also work well.

Note: An cheaper reprint of the book is available at Bokus

People

  • Course leader and lecturer: and
  • Exercise sessions: and
  • Hand-in tasks (see below):
  • SI sessions: Erik Raftö-Lindwall

Schedule

Intro meeting:
Monday, Sept 3, 2018, at 15:15, in Lecture Hall D (L315),
Kurslab (Building L), Fysicum, Sölvegatan 14.

Entire schedule is available at Live@Lund.

Preliminary course outline, fall 2018

w. 36
Chpt 1: Vector Calculus: nabla (del), grad, div, curl; Gauss' and Stokes' theorems; Dirac's delta function; plane, cylindrical, and spherical polar coordinates.
w. 37
Chpt 2: Coulomb's law, Gauss' law, electric potential, work and energy, conductors and capacitors
w. 38
Chpt 3: Laplace' eqn, separation of variables, multipole expansion
w. 39
Chpt 4: Polarization, polarization field, D-field, linear dielectrics
w. 40
Chpt 5: Lorentz force, Biot-Savart, Ampère's law, vector potential
w. 41
Chpt 6: Magnetization, magnetization field, H-field, linear media
w. 42
Chpts 7, 8.1: Electromotive force, induction, Maxwell's eqns, Poynting's theorem,
Chpt. 9.1-9.2: Wave eqn., EM waves in vacuum.
w. 43
Chpt 9.3: EM waves in matter
Chpt 10.1: The potential formulation, gauge transformations, relativistic formulation (N.B. this is chapter 12.1 in the Pearson new international edition).
w. 44
Repetition and written exam

Hand-in tasks

Each of the three or four hand-in tasks will be published via Live@Lund (L@L), and individual solutions are to be submitted as PDF via L@L, typically within six days, i.e, at the latest on the Thursday in the week after the exercise session, at 5 PM. The solutions should be written in a nice and easily readable manner, or typeset using a computer.

N.B. the bonus rules.

Exams

Exam rules: You can bring one A4-sheet of own notes. Notes on vector calculus and trigonometry will be provided. NO electronic equipment whatsoever will be allowed.

Written exam: Fri, Nov 2, 2018, at 8—13, in Medicon village, section IMV:1-6.
Registration is compulsory, via the Student Portal

Written re-exam: Was by mistake announced to be on Nov 23. Correct date will appear here when fixed.

Lecture notes

Lecture notes covering most of the lectures will be made available here.

Problem solving sessions

Problems covered in the exercise sessions will appear here (* = challenge).
  • Sept 10: 1.4, 1.11b, 1.15, 1.18, 1.22, 1.26d, 1.27, 1.28, 1.32c, 1.33, 1.34, *1.39 (b).
  • Sept 18: 1.39 (b), 1.47, 1.57 (in cyl. coord's), 1.59, 2.25 (a,c,a'), 2.30 (a,b,c), *2.47, 2.50 (+ plot ρ(r)).
  • Oct 1: 3.15, 3.21, 3.27, 3.42, *3.48, 4.18, 4.21.
  • Oct 9: 4.26, 4.35, *4.39, 5.14, 5.17, 5.27.
  • Oct 17: 6.12 (a=*), 6.16, 7.16 + 7.36, 7.22, 7.24 + 7.28 a,c.
  • Oct 25: 8.13*, 9.11 a—c, 9.18, 9.34 a—b, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5.

Miniproject assignments

From Fri 12/10 at 9:00 to Mon 15/10 at 17:00 you can register at the Live@Lund page for one of some 16 Miniproject subjects, in groups of two or three.

The aim is to explain the mechanisms involved in a modern application of electromagnetism, or an electromagnetic phenomenon, as described by the title, using 1000—1500 words (a couple of A4 pages of type-set text), aimed at your fellow students, and upload the resulting report as a PDF. (See guidelines below.)

Then in a second stage, your group will be assigned another group's report and asked to give a brief critique (assessment) using 200—300 words (half an A4 page of typeset text), where you review and assess the factual content of the report of the other group. Also the assessment is to be uploaded as a PDF. (See precise assignment description for the assessment below.)

Deadlines

The deadline for handing in the report for your project is Mon, Oct 22 at 13:00. On Wed, Oct 24, at 13:00, the assessment assignments will be published on L@L. The deadline for submitting your assessment is on Wed, Oct 31, at 17:00.

Guidelines

Having a clear structure with sections beginning with an Introduction and ending with a Summary/Discussion/Conclusions/Outlook improves the readability. At the same time for such a short text it is hardly necessary to use subsections.

Use figures for illustration when trying to explain more complicated relations. This will help the reader to understand better.

Since the aim of the projects is to describe a modern application of electromagnetism you should include connections to electromagnetism when possible, using equations etc., at a level comparable to what is done in the course. Of course this will vary from project to project, since the connections vary.

Referencing

- The sources you have used have to be numbered (or given some other unique marker) and they have to be referenced in the text — it is not enough to list them at the end,

- Only include references which are used in the text,

- When you are using a figure from somewhere else you have to give a reference in the figure caption,

- There are different ways of referencing, the main two ones being to use square brackets [1] or superscripts. Sometimes the first three letters of the first author and the year of publication are used, for example [Hig64],

- If you make a direct quote from a source then this has to be marked very clearly, for example using "quotation marks" or italics,

- The references should include the author(s), title, publication, and/or a URL; if it is a web-page you should also give the date it has been downloaded.

N.B. It is important to formulate the report with your own words. The text will be checked using Urkund.

Proofreading

- It is important that you proofread you article carefully. Spelling mistakes and grammatical errors will distract the reader from the content. In addition, saying the same thing several times using slightly different wording will tend to annoy the reader,

- It is often easier to understand a text with shorter sentences. Long, complicated sentences with lots of commas can throw the reader off course,

- Check that you have explained all acronyms and other technical terms that you are using.

Assignment description for the assessment

On Wednesday, Oct 24, your group will be asked to review and assess the factual content of the report of one of the other groups, using 200—300 words (about half an A4 page of typeset text). The deadline for submitting your review is Wednesday, Oct 31, at 17:00.

You should read through the report carefully, and assess it considering the following aspects:

  • The text should consist of 1000—1500 words, and should be aimed at describing and explaining the phenomenon on a level understandable for your fellow students.
  • It should contain an introduction with some background and context for the subject, then a main section where they describe and explain the phenomenon qualitatively, and if possible quantitatively, and at last a final discussion/conclusion part.
  • If information from a book, article or some website is used, there should be a proper citation to the source.

When formulating the feedback you should think about the following:

  • It is good practice to start with something positive when giving feedback. In addition it is better to formulate criticism in the form of suggestions for improvements rather than saying what not to do. (Admittedly this is easier said than done). Finally it is also nice to end with something positive
  • When giving feedback you should not only think about what is written but also what is missing.
  • You can have one sentence in the beginning saying what the text you are giving feedback on is about, but since the feedback is aimed at the authors you should not try to summarize the contents of what they have written.
  • Remember to write your name(s) and the title as well as author(s) of the project you are giving feedback on.

You can find information about which group report that your group should assess on Live@Lund

Exercises

There are lots of useful problems in the book by Griffiths. Note that there are two classes of problems:

  • within the text - designed to be done as you go along (but can still be quite lengthy)
  • end of chapter - longer and of a more general nature
For the first kind of problems we suggest that you look at all of them and think about how you would solve them. Below you find a list with the problems that we think are most useful.
  • Chpt 1: 1.4, 1.11b, 1.15, 1.18, 1.19, 1.22, 1.26d, 1.27, 1.28, 1.32c, 1.33, 1.34; 1.39, 1.41, 1.44d, 1.45c, 1.46, 1.47, 1.48, 1.49, 1.50a, 1.53
  • Chpt 2: 2.2, 2.6, 2.9, 2.12, 2.13, 2.15, 2.16, 2.17, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.24, 2.25, 2.28, 2.31, 2.34, 2.36, 2.39, 2.41, 2.43
    (3rd ed: 2.2, 2.6, 2.9, 2.12, 2.13, 2.15, 2.16, 2.17, 2.18, 2.19, 2.20, 2.21, 2.24, 2.25, 2.28, 2.31, 2.32, 2.34, 2.36, 2.37, 2.39)
  • Chpt 3: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.13, 3.14, 3.18, 3.20, 3.21, 3.27, 3.29, 3.30, 3.32, 3.33, 3.34, 3.36
    (3rd ed: 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.12, 3.13, 3.17, 3.19, 3.20, 3.26, 3.27, 3.28, 3.30, 3.31, 3.32, 3.33)
  • Chpt 4: 4.5, 4.7, 4.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 4.15, 4.16, 4.17, 4.18, 4.19, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, 4.26
    (3rd ed: 4.5, 4.7, 4.8, 4.10, 4.11, 4.14, 4.15, 4.16, 4.17, 4.18, 4.19, 4.20, 4.21, 4.22, 4.23, 4.26)
  • Chpt 5: 5.3, 5.5, 5.6, 5.8, 5.10a, 5.13, 5.14, 5.16, 5.17, 5.21, 5.24, 5.26a, 5.30, 5.32, 5.34, 5.37a, 5.37b, 5.38
    (3rd ed: 5.3, 5.5, 5.6, 5.8, 5.10a, 5.12, 5.13, 5.15, 5.16, 5.20, 5.23, 5.25a, 5.29, 5.31, 5.33, 5.35, 5.36, 5.60)
  • Chpt 6: 6.7, 6.8, 6.9, 6.12, 6.13, 6.14, 6.16, 6.17, 6.21
    (3rd ed: 6.7, 6.8, 6.9, 6.12, 6.13, 6.14, 6.16, 6.17, 6.21 )
  • Chpt 7: 7.7, 7.8, 7.12, 7.14, 7.22, 7.24, 7.28, 7.34, 7.35
    (3rd ed: 7.7, 7.8, 7.12, 7.14, 7.20, 7.22, 7.26, 7.31, 7.32)
  • Chpt 8: 8.2
    (3rd ed: 8.2)
  • Chpt 9: 9.2, 9.3, 9.8, 9.9, 9.12, 9.15, 9.16, 9.17, 9.18
    (3rd ed: 9.2, 9.3, 9.8, 9.9, 9.11, 9.14, 9.15, 9.16, 9.17)
  • Chpt 10: 10.1, 10.3, 10.4, 10.5, 10.6
    (3rd ed: 10.1, 10.3+10.5, 10.4, 10.6, 10.7)
For the second kind of problems I have listed those that I find especially useful below.
  • Chpt 1: 1.54, 1.57 (cyl coord), 1.59, 1.61, 1.62 (3rd ed: 1.53, 1.56 (cyl coord), 1.58, 1.60, 1.61)
  • Chpt 2: 2.46, 2.47, 2.48, 2.49, 2.50
    (3rd ed: 2.42, 2.43, 2.44, 2.45, 2.46)
  • Chpt 3: 3.43, 3.44, 3.46, 3.47, 3.48, 3.52
    (3rd ed: 3.37, 3.38, 3.40, 3.41, 3.42, 3.45)
  • Chpt 4: 4.30, 4.33, 4.35, 4.36, 4.39, 4.41
    (3rd ed: 4.30, 4.31, 4.32, 4.33, 4.36, 4.38)
  • Chpt 5: 5.41, 5.48, 5.57, 5.58, 5.61
    (3rd ed: 5.39, 5.47a, 5.55, 5.56, 5.59)
  • Chpt 6: 6.25, 6.26
    (3rd ed: 6.23, 6.24 )
  • Chpt 7: 7.44, 7.47, 7.60
    (3rd ed: 7.42, 7.45, 7.55)
  • Chpt 8: 8.13, 8.23a
    (3rd ed: 8.9, 8.15a)
  • Chpt 9: 9.35, 9.39
    (3rd ed: 9.33, 9.37)
  • Chpt 10:

Old exams

Nov 2018 (and solutions)

May 2018 (and solutions)

Oct 2017 (and solutions)

May 2017 (and solutions)

Collection of some mathematical formulas that are useful for electromagnetism (updated June 2, 2015). Will be handed out at exam.

Formulas you can use without deriving them (unless asked to).

Other messages

Further reading

R.K. Wangsness, Electromagnetic Fields, 2nd edition. Wiley.

J.D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics, 3rd edition. Wiley.

B. Thidé, Electromagnetic Field Theory, 2nd, (online textbook)